Pets Insights

2018 may be Year of the Dog according to the Chinese zodiac, but in Australia every year is year of the dog! Australia is reported to have one of the highest rates of pet ownership in the world, and of the 1,000 Australian pet owners that we surveyed, 71% of them own a dog. It is estimated that more than 60% of Australian households own a pet and most consider their pets to be part of the family. Despite this, there is not much Australian research about pet ownership and the petcare category. Here’s what we found out from 1,000 Australian pet owners.

ABOUT AUSSIE PET OWNERS

Agents were only too happy to share with us some pictures of their pets. Here are some of the faces of the pets behind the stats in this survey.

PET RETAIL

Aussie pet owners overwhelmingly still prefer bricks and mortar retailers over online retailers, with supermarkets dominating pet food retail, and rating highly among other key purchase categories.

THE PET FOOD SHOPPER

When it comes to pet food, most pet owners are not looking for the cheapest brand they can find. Almost half of pet owners ranked quality ingredients as their first or second most important factor when purchasing pet food. Only 17% of shoppers rated price as the most important factor.
Dietary requirements was another important consideration that ranked marginally more important than price and value for money, and the dietary elements that shoppers consider most when purchasing pet food continue to demonstrate the consumer behaviour of humanising pet food.

Whilst shoppers may be seeking out brands that have natural colours and flavours, no preservatives and minimal processing, the vast majority of pet owners place great trust in the high quality and safety standards for food and manufacturing in Australia, and are not aware that the pet food industry is self-regulated (80%). This may all change soon however, as we await the outcome of the Senate inquiry into regulatory approaches to ensure the safety of pet food, due to be delivered on October 16, 2018.

PAMPERED PETS

Australians do not think that their pets are overly pampered – though the scores are notably different for those who consider their pets to be ‘Animals that they care for’ (ave. rating 3.3) versus those who consider their pets to be their children, also known as ‘fur-babies’ (ave.rating 7.9). Pet owners like to express the love they have for their pets by buying them gifts, such as edible treats and toys.

FOCUS ON FUR BABIES

Insights on Alcohol Consumption in Australia: Part 2

Recently we shared our infograph of the alcohol consumption and purchase habits of 1,000 Australian drinkers. (If you missed Part 1, you can find it here).
In Part 2 you will learn about:
  • Alcoholic drinks of choice across consumption occasions;
  • Adjacent consumption categories of spirit mixers and snacking;
  • Social trends impacting purchase decisions; and
  • Offline versus online behaviour.

I like to have a beer rum with Duncan

When you consider the penetration level of various alcohols and the occasions in which they are most popular, it’s easy to see that alcohol plays a huge role in Australian culture. White spirits achieved the highest level of penetration amongst drinkers, and the most popular occasions for drinking white spirits are when socialising, whether that’s at a licensed venue, at home with others or at a big event or party. Sparkling wine came a close second, with most people enjoying sparkling wine to celebrate special events such as weddings.

When it comes to domestic settings, cider has certainly made its way into the mainstream, proving a popular choice ahead of both craft and non-craft beer. 
Wine excels across many consumption occasions, particularly at home and accompanying a meal at a restaurant. Although penetration is low, rosé is a popular choice for drinking at home with others and at weddings and large events, suggesting that it is an appealing option for something a little different to white wine. Interestingly, when it comes to weddings and big events, men are more likely than women to reach for the rosè!
This macro view of alcohol consumption does not take into account the frequency or volume of consumption – nonetheless, it represents opportunities for brand growth through increasing penetration and breaking into new consumption occasions.

Getting into the Spirit

Want to know what alcohol makes it into the hearts and homes of real Australians? We asked! Check out some examples of our Agents’ home liquor stashes.

And how are Aussies drinking spirits? Mostly mixed – full sugar soft drinks are still the most popular spirit mixers, with a preference for soda water or tonic water over diet soft drinks. Cocktails are also a popular choice, particularly among Millennials (25% vs 19% Gen X). The slow drinking movement favours a serving on the rocks – and we even asked this survey in the middle of Winter!

Top Tipple Nibbles

When it comes to snacking when drinking, savoury snacks are where it’s at. Potato chips are the most popular snack of choice, with Aussies proving almost as fond of cheese platters. There are some intrinsic differences between males and females when it comes to snack choice – females prefer cheese platters (73%) over potato chips (63%), whereas males prefer potato chips (71%) over cheese platters (55%). Females also prefer antipasto platters (45%) over nuts (29%), whereas men prefer nuts (38%) over antipasto platters (32%).

Social Trends Impacting Purchase Decisions

Many liquor brands are looking to social trends to remain relevant and unlock new sources of growth. When it comes to health considerations, the top two priorities are low carb (29%) and low sugar (25%). Interestingly, our research indicates that 40.5% of drinkers do not consider any health or social responsibility factors when purchasing alcohol, and of the 59.5% that do, most consider which products are Australian made and/or owned ahead of diet and health factors.

Online Versus Offline Behaviour

In an age where online retail is challenging bricks and mortar, and print media is struggling to compete with online publications, packaged alcohol is one category that is slow to move. In Part 1 of our study we reported that 93% of packaged alcohol purchases are still made in-store. You may also be surprised to learn that more than half of alcohol drinkers check out the alcohol specials in catalogues and newspapers, highlighting the need to nail the in-store execution of planned promotions and validating that print media continues to be a valuable investment of marketing dollars.
Online consumer behaviour is a vastly different story. In the past six months only 16% of alcohol drinkers have ordered alcohol online using a click and collect option, and the uptake of delivery options are lower again with only 9% having ordered for same-day delivery and only 2% having tried an on-demand delivery service. However, when queried about the likelihood of purchasing alcohol to be delivered same-day within the next six months, 62% were open to the possibility.
For now, our data suggests that brands and retailers can get the best bang for their online-buck by curating content that inspires consumers with recipes and credible online reviews, but the bulk of resources should still be focussed on in-store execution, engagement and shopper insights.

Back To School Shopping [Report]

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As the holiday season winds down, post-Christmas sales are in full swing with research, conducted by Roy Morgan in association with Australian Retailers Association (ARA), predicting that Aussie shoppers will spend $17.2 billion from 26 December to 15 January.

According to the ARA chief Russell Zimmerman, the research is indicative of shopper focus on back to school sales.
Zimmerman says that retailers selling clothing, footwear, stationery and technology will see a big sales boost as back to school draws near and parents stock up on back to school essentials.
Field Agent wanted to understand the back-to-school mindset a little deeper, so we surveyed 400 Australian parents with school aged children on all things ‘Back To School’ (BTS).
Let this research help your brand/s make the grade with Back To School shoppers in 2017.

Back To School Budget Pressure

Our study of 400 households suggests most families are anticipating spending more (44%) or about the same (35%) on back-to-school in 2017. Only 9% will spend less.
The whopping 78% of parents surveyed agreed BTS is a strain on their household budgets.

Stocking up for Back To School

Predictably, uniforms (83%), basic school supplies (82%), and footwear (91%) top the list of general BTS merchandise purchases. However, half (or more) of all households surveyed said they’re planning on making purchases in all nine categories presented, suggesting BTS has important implications for brands across many categories. Some, including athletic equipment, electronic, are more vulnerable to the influence of age (i.e., grade-level) than others.

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Influences on Back To School

Make the list = make the sale

Many households follow a school-furnished list either “very closely” (35%) or “fairly closely” (33%) when shopping for BTS supplies. In all, 93% will follow their school’s list at least a little. Specific brand name mentions have some influence over shoppers’ choices, with 38% calling them moderately influential and 34% calling them “extremely” or “very” influential.

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How Brands Can Make The Grade

Top Shopping Priorities Amongst BTS Mums 

What really matters when shopping inside stores for BTS supplies? 76% made Quality a #1 or #2 priority and Price was also #1 or #2 priority for 76% of shoppers. Factors such as brand name or loyalty ranked the lowest priority at 65% and 66% respectively.

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Kids Call The Shots

Influence of children on BTS purchases

“But MUM!” You can hear the kids’ cries already. To what extent do the users of BTS purchases, the kids, influence the shoppers (mums and dads)? Kids wield considerable influence it seems over clothing/footwear and even the contents of packed lunches.

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Back To School Shopping Destinations

Preferred retailers for BTS Supplies

At 70%, Kmart sits high atop the retail mountain for selling school supplies, with Officeworks (62%) and Big W (52%) not far behind. On the question of who sells the most back-to-school clothing, aside from specialised uniform shops which take the biggest slice of the pie at 71%, 41% are getting their school clothing basics from Kmart and Target is a close second choice (38%). Of course, BTS is a big pie and many retailers enjoy a slice. 62% told us they will visit 2-3 stores to purchase school supplies.

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Role of Online Retailers for BTS Shoppers

Households do shop online for BTS supplies; they just don’t shop online a great deal with 38% not looking online at all. 62% say they are likely to purchase some school supplies from the Internet. As for the threads, 62% surveyed say they “not at all likely” to purchase BTS clothing and footwear online, and only 20% saying they are either “completely, very or moderately likely” to purchase clothing or footwear online. It seems most want their children to be able to try on clothing and footwear for the best fit prior to the school year.

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Inside That Brown Bag

Content Of Packed Lunches

Here’s an important question for food and beverage companies: What’s in the packed lunch? The focus on a healthy packed lunch is emphasised throughout most Australian schools, so it’s encouraging to see fruit, water and sandwiches as the most popular lunch box options, with a much smaller percentage of households including non-nutritious snacks such as soft drinks and lollies. For more than half of household surveyed (52%), shopping for packed lunch contents is a weekly affair, while 40% visit stores two or more times a week to supply their kids’ packed lunches.

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Snack Attack

Sometimes, the lunchbox contents fall short, or maybe the household ran out of time to pack an adequate lunch for the children. For those quick before and after-school meals, more than half listed Coles (26%) and Woolworths (25%) as the best quick option to hit the spot. McDonalds (10%) was slightly more popular than ALDI (7%).

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Frustrations with BTS shopping

Navigating the shops with a long list can be frustrating enough, but add to that the combination of not finding what you need, high prices or crowds and you have a recipe for annoyed shoppers. A whopping 53% said that out-of-stock products are one of the most frustrating parts of BTS shopping.

What Kids Have To Say

While most kids are excited and looking forward to starting or returning to school, there are also still nerves for some.


School The Competition This Year

Which brands will win Back To School 2017? Simple. Those that prepare and execute the best.
Mobile Audits & Research combine to offer companies a fast, affordable and simple way to learn about back-to-school shoppers and ensure BTS plans are properly executed inside stores.
So make the grade this back-to-school shopping season. Look to Mobile Audits & Research.

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Christmas Holiday Report – Part 2: Christmas Shopping The Australian Way

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As Christmas fast approaches, Field Agent set out to further understand how Aussie’s tackle their Christmas shopping. We present you with Part 2 of our Christmas Holiday Report, offering 9 pivotal insights into the attitudes and behaviours of 500 Australian Christmas shoppers with children in their households.

1. Which of the following are particularly important to you as you shop for and buy Christmas gifts?

When asked what are the most important factors to consider when Christmas shopping, it seems we are a budget savvy-bunch. Women are more likely to state that affordability /low cost is more important than males (82% vs 74% respectively). Women are also more likely to give ‘sentimentality’ as an important reason to buy Christmas gifts (46% female vs 36% male).

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2. When purchasing Christmas gifts this year, which 3 retailers will receive most of your business?

When purchasing Christmas gifts, it appears that the large discount department stores are likely to get most of the shoppers spend. Women are likely to shop at Kmart and Target compared to men. Aussie men are more likely to spend their Christmas budget at JB Hi-Fi, Toys R Us, Bunnings and Rebel Sport.

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3. Compared to last year, do you expect to spend more or less on gifts, decorations, toys, electronics and groceries?

Despite the uncertainty in the economy, Australian’s are still happy to spend up at Christmas time with over half of shoppers saying that they intend to spend a little more or a lot more than in 2015. Gifts in general are on the increase with 60% of people saying they will spend more. Other items including groceries (50%), toys (45%), electronics (43%) and decorations (35%) are all forecasted as a higher expenditure than in 2015.

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4. How likely are you to shop online for gifts this Christmas season?

The convenience of online shopping is stronger than ever, with nearly two thirds of shoppers citing they are ‘extremely/very likely’ to buy gifts online this Christmas. Men (64%) are more likely than women (50%) stating they are ‘extremely/very likely’ to purchase Christmas gifts online. Only 1% responded that they are ‘not at all likely’ to shop online this Christmas. The popularity of ‘web-rooming’ (when consumers research products online, then come into a physical store to buy them) and ‘show-rooming’ (the practice of examining merchandise in a traditional brick and mortar retail store or other offline setting, and then buying it online, sometimes at a lower price) is on the increase. With this in mind, it’s even more important for retailers to offer an omni-channel shopping experience to ensure they capitalise on all forms of shopping.

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5. Looking ahead, which of the following gifts are your children likely to receive for Christmas this year?

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6. How much do you expect to spend PER CHILD (in dollars) on Christmas gifts THIS holiday season?

The average spend per child for Christmas is expected to be about $290; with approximately a third of shoppers saying that they plan to spend between $201 – $500 per child.

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7. How much approximately do you expect to spend on your spouse/partner (in dollars) for Christmas gifts this season?

The average spend on a spouse/partner is $268. Men are likely to spend $100 more on their female spouse than women are on their male spouse. Perhaps this due to the ritual of men traditionally leaving their Christmas shopping to the last minute and not taking the time to shop around for the best deal (or maybe they are happy to splurge on their female spouse and indulge their expensive requests!).

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8. When shopping for groceries to enhance your Christmas celebrations, how much influence do in-store product displays have over your purchase decisions?

With a massive 77% of shoppers stating that they are either ‘moderately influenced, very influenced or extremely influenced’ on grocery displays at Christmas time, it shows the importance of having a strong merchandising strategy. An important ingredient in retail display execution is measuring compliance. Are your products ticketed as they should be? Are they fully stocked? Field Agent truly are your eyes and ears in peak promotional periods to ensure you’re capitalising on the strong retail trade. Less than 1 in 10 feel that in-store product displays will be extremely influential in their product decision.

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9. How likely are you to purchase at least one Christmas gift for your PET this Christmas?

Pets play such an important role in Australian families, that it only seems appropriate that they too, receive a special something to mark the season of giving.

Of those shoppers that own a pet, a whopping 75% will purchase at least one gift for their pet at Christmas. Only 1 in 10 shoppers said that they were not at all likely to purchase a gift for their pet.
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We encourage you to share this report with your team and your colleagues. As always, if you have any questions or want to talk further about how Field Agent can help you better understand your business, drop us us an email.

Did you download our Big Honking Tree Topping Guide to Christmas Shoppers 2016? It’s not too late.

Make it a Christmas season to remember and download the report now. 

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10 Reasons Your In-Store Displays Aren’t Converting Shoppers

An in-store display may seem like a pretty predictable thing: it’s set up; it’s stocked; and, voila, shoppers pick up your product. Simple, right?

But the typical retail operation is a swirling vortex of labour issues, managerial pressures, logistical complexities, seasonal obligations, dynamic pricing structures, information overloads/shortages, and an assortment of other factors that make display compliance much less certain.

Indeed, according to Retailing Today’s annual survey of the supplier community, “ensuring merchandise initiatives are executed at the store level” is the top challenge FMCG companies face with retail partners.

It can be difficult to determine the exact reasons your displays aren’t being properly executed in stores. Display non-compliance often results from a complex combination of personnel, managerial, logistical, and informational factors.

Consider 10 practical reasons your in-store displays may not be selling more effectively:

  1. Your point-of-sale materials never arrived at the store

Some displays are doomed from the start, because that fixture, rack, clip strip, sign, or other merchandising material never arrived at the store. It didn’t even get its foot in the door.

Perhaps the display materials never left your company (you know how organisational communication is), or maybe a simple shipping error prevented them from arriving in-store?

  1. Your POS display materials arrived but the product didn’t

Naturally your POS materials need products to showcase. But display effectiveness is partly dependent on supply chain efficiency—getting the right product to the right place at the right time in the right amounts.

What if, for example, the retailer’s inventory/execution management system reduces or cancels your shipment due to apparent high inventory levels? What if the store “turned off” all non-everyday product shipments?

  1. Your display never made it to the store floor (it’s in the backroom)

In the merchandising game, it’s helpful to understand the tension between corporate execution plans and store-level realities. Local managers, contending with everything from surplus inventory to finicky local shoppers, may stray from corporate plans—including those delineating the details of your shopper marketing campaigns.

Your display, frankly, may be a low managerial priority at the store-level. Local management may want to push high inventory out the door, or they may be convinced another display will result in more sales.

  1. Your display is ‘lost’ in the store

It could be lost physically. By way of illustration, high inventory in or poor management of the backroom may block your display materials or product from employees’ view.

  1. Your display is a casualty of inaccurate information

Your display could be virtually lost. The retailer’s inventory management system, for one reason or another (e.g., human error), reflects that your display is in store and on the floor.

But the reality is: your display is MIA.

  1. Your display is on the floor but in the wrong place

But even if your display makes it to the store floor, who’s to say it’s in the correct place? Many possibilities exist for why a display might end up in the wrong part of the store:

  • Human error
  • Space is at a premium and store personnel position displays wherever they can find space
  • Local managers may feel other displays will sell better, and, thus, demote your display to a less visible corner of the store
  • Stores may be eager to unload high or seasonal inventory, even if it means deviating from corporate plans.

  1. Your display is on the floor but stocked with the wrong product

Perish the thought, right? But it happens.

Maybe the display is stocked with the wrong version of your product? Or, worse – it’s almost hard to write – your display is stocked with competing and substitutable merchandise.

  1. Your display is on the floor but paired with the wrong signage, video, or other aids

The display is largely there but the expensive bells and whistles are missing, leaving you and others wondering why sales are disappointing.

Yes, your product is positioned well and is fully stocked but the digital TV display is missing or playing the wrong ad.

Yes, your four-way display is on the main aisle, but the visually alluring signage is collecting dust in the backroom.

  1. Your display execution is a casualty of budget constraints

Often companies will fork out the funds for in-store displays and other POP materials, yet they don’t, won’t, or can’t budget for their effective execution.

  1. Your display execution lacks visibility

You can’t fix what you can’t see.

Consequently, the remedy for many of the problems above is pretty simple: greater in-store visibility.

Thanks to advancements in mobile technology and crowdsourcing, companies can now be with their displays wherever they are—and quickly spot problems with display compliance.

Mobile Audits offer a fast, affordable, and far-reaching way to take control of your display execution.

Shopping For Your Valentine [Survey]

 

Shopping for your ValentineField Agent went on-location for the most romantic of holidays: Valentine’s. Our survey of lovers across Australia paints a picture on what Aussies like to do to mark the day.

Valentine’s Day is big business. Australians spend about $791 million on Valentine’s Day and $91 million on flowers. Genevieve McCaskill,  Marketing & Events Co-ordinator at Flowers Victoria, said the average amount spent was $70 to $90 per transaction.

HOW IMPORTANT IS VALENTINE’S DAY?

Of the survey respondents, almost half consider Valentine’s Day to be somewhat/extremely important (49%).

Those who are engaged consider Valentine’s Day as more important than those that are married or casually dating with 93% of engaged couples counting Valentine’s Day is somewhat / extremely important. 63% of those in a relationship (but are not engaged or married) consider Valentines Day to be somewhat/extremely important, whilst only 44% of those married place the same importance on Valentine’s Day. Perhaps this is an example that the so-called ‘honeymoon period’ fades as the relationship ages!

48% of woman consider Valentine’s Day somewhat / extremely important versus 53% of men. Anecdotally, this may be due to men showing appreciation for partners on this day (and the giving of gifts is traditionally something that men would purchase for female partners).

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GIFTS:

On average, men spend more than women with over 50% of men spending $50-$200 whilst women tend to make handmade gestures such as a home cooked meal or a chocolate on a pillow.

The gift that MOST would like to receive is to be taken out for a meal. 23% female & 20% male. Other popular gifts are weekend away (10%), flowers (10%) and movies (10%). Only 4% actually want chocolates or sweets!

Of course, it’s worth mentioning the lucky 1% who receives gift/s from $1000+ splurge!

Overall, bricks & mortar stores were the winners with 44% of lovers preferring to shop in a physical store. 24% opted for online shopping whilst 32% chose not to purchase store-bought gifts at all. Shopping tends to be from chain stores such as David Jones, Target, Big W, Kmart and Myer. The prominent source for online gifts is eBay.

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SOCIAL MEDIA:
 

Those who say they will share their Valentine’s Day experience on social media are most likely to use Facebook. Only a quarter say that they intend to share via social media; showing this is an intimate occasion for most. Most likely age group to share are those aged 25-34. Females more likely to share via social media than males (82% vs 18%). Perhaps as a status confirmation – If it’s on Facebook (AKA Brag-Book) it must be true!

See the infograph below for the full results:

VALENTINES DAY 2016

 

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Selling to Football Fans: How Brands Win With 3 Game-Changing Plays

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With AFL and NRL Finals season days away, Field Agent is opening up its playbook. This article describes and illustrates 3 ‘game-changing plays’ for better serving football fans. Mobile audits and research allow companies to be where the action is happening, as it’s happening, throughout football season. So let us demonstrate the ways we help companies better serve customers and outperform competitors…when the game’s on the line.      

We take football seriously here at Field Agent. Very seriously.

It’s that time of year when our office starts buzzing with conversations—and even a little trash-talking—about our favorite teams, you know, how “this is the year we win the Premiership.”

But there’s another reason we take football seriously. Starting in August, many clients rely on us to win their own football competitions: the battle for football fans and the dollars they spend on merchandise to enhance their football-viewing experiences.

For nearly four years we’ve been equipping brands, retailers, and agencies with the information and insights to better serve their customers, refine their in-store executions, and outperform their competitors.

We do this especially during critical shopping events such as Finals season, when fans throughout the country flock to stores to purchase supplies for game-viewing parties, backyard barbecues, and of course, attending the big game itself.

We want to share a glimpse inside our company playbook, and briefly describe 3 ways Field Agent helps companies win during football season.


Play #1. Mobile Audits take you inside stores throughout the football season, so you can be closer to your products and in-store promotions.

Have our retail partners properly executed our football-themed in-store displays and signage? Are our products actually on store shelves as shoppers stroll by, or are they out-of-stock and unavailable to purchase-minded football fans? Do our products reflect the correct promotional prices to entice the spending of football fans?

Companies often bring such questions to us, particularly during critical shopping seasons. Geography separates brands from the retailers that sell their products, resulting in limited vision inside stores. But Mobile Audits provide vendors a fast, affordable means for monitoring their products and promotions at-retail.

To illustrate, this weekend we sent 30 auditors—we call them agents—to 30 different stores across the country. We asked them to take pictures of football-themed products and in-store displays:

Promo display

Companies use such images, which we verify through a multi-step quality control process, to monitor display placement, product availability, product pricing, and so on.

And because our agents are also retail customers, your customers, a mobile audit is also an ideal opportunity to gather consumer insights—quickly and affordably.

Companies also use these audits to collect qualitative insights from shoppers. As one agent commented, “I like the theme [of the display]. I’m a huge football fan! It definitely appeals to me to grab some Pringles to snack on during the game.”

This football season, mobile audits are your eyes and ears inside stores.


Play #2. Mobile Research allows you to be where the action is happening, as it’s happening. From man caves to backyard barbeques, companies can “be there” throughout football season.

Through the powerful combination of mobile technology and crowdsourcing, Mobile Research allows companies to be on-location with football fans—wherever they may be. In living rooms or stadium seats, we put companies directly among consumers, as they’re using specific brands and products.

During Football Final season last year, our sister company Field Agent USA visited the homes of 250 fans. We asked a variety of questions about their game day behaviours—as they were happening, and not, as with traditional research, days, months, or years after they had happened.

For instance, we asked agents to identify what activities they were participating in during the game. At 24%, “grilling food” topped the list, followed by “mixing alcoholic beverages” (18%) and “eating takeaway food.’” (12%).

We also asked agents to take pictures of their game day food spreads:

Food Spread

And because mobile research utilises smartphone technology, agents can also shoot video as well as still images.

Throughout football season, mobile research is a nimble and powerful means of collecting in-the-moment consumer insights—anywhere, anytime.


Play #3. During the biggest games of the year, whether it’s the AFL or NRL Grand Final, Mobile Research captures real-time information to help companies make better decisions and monitor performance.

Last year hundreds of companies looked on as Field Agent USA, conducted its thrilling Game Day Brand Wars campaign. We tracked, in real-time, what beer, soft drinks and chip brands fans were consuming during the Super Bowl.

Our ultimate goal was to determine which brands took home Most Valuable Player awards for best Super Bowl performance, and companies watched in anticipation as live results streamed onto our website.

Bud Light (13%), Coca-Cola (26%), and Tostitos (21%) won their respective categories. More than 500 agents ultimately participated in our inaugural Brand Wars.

Our Brand Wars campaign illustrates how mobile research may be used to collect real-time, up-to-the-minute information and insights during the biggest games of the football season.

Want to know what football fans think about your new commercial, the one airing during Friday Night Football? Mobile research can tell you. In real-time.

Interested to know how your brands and products are performing at backyard barbeques across the country? Mobile research can show you that as well.

If you need results as events are happening, mobile research can track the consumer attitudes and behaviors that matter most to your business.


Get in the Game  

Whatever your ‘need to know,’ mobile audits and research provide a direct link to your products, wherever they are, and your customers, wherever they are. And because Field Agent offers solutions in a fraction of the time and cost of traditional methods, this football season companies can get in the game—and win it—more easily than ever.

How Brands Win V2

Mother’s Day Shopper Insights – Case Study

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The Challenge

To demonstrate how the Field Agent™ iPhone App can be used to check promotional compliance and gain an understanding of shopper views on various Mother’s Day promotional displays across a sample group of retailers throughout Australia. A solution was required that would:

  • gather feedback & photographs in a cost-effective way
  • collect ‘in the moment’ insights

The Solution

Field Agent™ was best suited to this task as it has the capability to deliver information and photos from over 20,000 iPhone users registered with the free Field Agent™ App across Australia.

The Project

The project required 85 shoppers, who we call Agents, to complete the required tasks during their next shopping trip in the week prior to Mother’s Day, 2011. Agents were instructed to find the ‘Best Mother’s Day merchandise or stand’, take a photo of it and answer the following questions:

  • What is the name of the shopping centre/ precinct you are shopping in today?
  • What suburb are you in?
  • Are you shopping for a Mother’s Day gift on this shopping trip
  • Which store has the most attractive Mother’s Day merchandise / stand on this trip?
  • What is it about this display that you find most attractive?
  • Does the displayed merchandise state the date of Mother’s Day?

Sample Insights

  1. Types of Stores with the most attractive displays:
  • Specialty stores 37%
  • Supermarket/department 31%
  • Clothing (inc lingerie) 12%
  • Newsagents 6%
  • Chemist 6%
  • Florist 5%
  • Jewellers 3%

2. Use of colours was the most popular reason for rating the Mother’s Day merchandise/stand attractive:

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Supermarket – Case Study

  

Supermarket Benchmark Survey

We recently asked a group of shoppers from our 15,000 Field Agents* around Australia to visit one of five supermarket brands on new year’s eve (2012) to demonstrate how our Field Agent iPhone App can assist businesses check merchandise compliance, stock levels, price and more within their stores and the broader industry. Each person who accepted a supermarket assignment in this case study exercise was asked to do so only if they were the ‘main household supermarket shopper’ and doing a ‘supermarket visit’ at any time during the day on New Year’s Eve, 31st December, 2011. While doing this supermarket shop they were asked to answer and do the following:

1.  Take a photo of the 2 litre Original Coca Cola bottles in the soft drink isle.
2.  What is the price of the 2 litre Original Coca Cola?
3.  Take a photo of all products in your trolley or basket before checkout.
4.  How long did it take to be served when you joined the queue at the checkout?
5.  Was the staff member who served you neat, tidy and presentable?
6.  Rate the friendliness of the staff member who served you at the checkout.
7.  Rate your overall satisfaction of your shopping experience today.
8.  Which option best describes your soft drink purchasing habits?
9.  Were there any items you intended to purchase that were not available today?
10.If so, what items were you unable to purchase today?

* registered shoppers with the iPhone App ‘Field Agent’ on their iPhone.

How did these brands compare against each other?

Sample Photos of Products in Trolley/Basket

(a)  ALDI
ALDI – Qld, Burpengary, 31 Dec 2011, 4.22pm
ALDI – Qld, Chermside, 31 Dec 2011, 12.16pm
ALDI – Vic, Preston, 31 Dec 2011, 11.34am

    

(b)  Foodworks
Foodworks – Vic, Narreewarren, 31 Dec 2011, 2.20pm
Foodworks – Vic, Sunbury, 31 Dec 2011, 6.59pm

  

(c)  IGA
IGA – Qld, Chermside, 31 Dec 2011, 12.35pm
IGA – Vic, Murrumbeena, 31 Dec 2011, 7.55pm
IGA – WA, Lynwood, 31 Dec 2011, 3.15pm
IGA – WA, Mt Lowley, 31 Dec 2011, 12.08pm

      

(d)  Coles
Coles – Qld, Chermside, 31 Dec 2011, 11.47am
Coles – WA, Erskine, 31 Dec 2011, 2.20pm
Coles – NSW, Sydney, 31 Dec 2011, 11.44am
Coles – NT, Palmerston, 31 Dec 2011, 12.19pm
Coles – Vic, Wheelers Hill, 31 Dec 2011, 7.53pm

        

(e)  Woolworths
Woolworths – Vic, Baxter, 31 Dec 2011, 1.07pm
Woolworths – Qld, Chermside, 31 Dec 2011, 11.29am
Woolworths – Vic, Mulgrave, 31 Dec 2011, 6.32pm
Woolworths – NT, Palmerston, 31 Dec 2011, 1.38pm

      

Supermarket Industry Benchmark Data

45% of customers waited more than 1 but less than 2 minutes to be served whilst waiting in a checkout queue.

34% of staff at check out were rated as ‘extremely friendly’

18% of shoppers found there were items unavailable they had intended to purchase.

52% of customers rated the overall shopping experience as ‘great’.

Sample Product Photos


Coles, Doncaster, VIC 3.24pm,, Dec 31st 2011.


Woolworths, Chermside, Qld 11.28am, Dec 31st 2011.


IGA, Castlemaine, Vic 5.40pm, Dec 31st, 2011.


Foodworks, Naree Warren South, Vic, 3.20pm, Dec 31st 2011.

Coffee Benchmark Survey – 5 Australian Coffee Companies

We recently asked our 15,000 Field Agents around Australia to visit one of five coffee companies we randomly selected to demonstrate how our Field Agent™ iPhone App can assist you understand customer service standards within the coffee industry. Each person who accepted a coffee assignment was asked to visit the specified cafe and order a cappuccino or latte (no size specified). Whilst in the cafe they were asked the following questions:

1.  Did the staff member suggest a larger size to you?
2.  Were you asked for a food item with your order?
3.  Did the team member ask you for your name?
4.  How long did it take to wait for your order?
5.  Take a photo of your coffee before you drink it.
6.  Based on the taste of the coffee, would you return to this company for a coffee in the future?

How did these brands compare against each other?

Industry Benchmark Data

Sample Coffee Photos

Coffee Club, Perth, WA
McCafe, Frankston, VIC
Mrs Fields, Sydney, NSW
Starbucks, Woolloongabba, QLD
Gloria Jeans, Hobart, TAS